World Archaeological Congress







TOP NEWS STORIES

Newsletter: Volume 27 April 2009

Contributions to the next WAC Newsletter due 18th May 2009

Archaeologists Without Borders Workshop

Report on the website of the World Archaeological Congress

Archaeologies of Art Podcast Series Launched!

Call for WAC members to nominate Indigenous people

World Archaeological Congress honors Larry Zimmerman

Dr Andree Rosenfeld

Recommendation on ERA Draft Quality Ranking

WAC-6 Media Releases

WAC-6 Closing Ceremony Speech

Portuguese WAC-6 Media Releases

German WAC-6 Media Releases

Spanish WAC-6 Media Releases

Turkish WAC-6 Media Releases

Czech. WAC-6 Media Release on Iran

 

 


eNewsletters

Volume 17 August 2007

Click here to download PDF

1. Executive News

There was a short article published in The  Times by Norman Hammond on Peter Ucko on 10 August. Links.

For 8 appreciations of Peter please see ANTIQUITY's web site (antiquity.ac.ukuk/inmemoriam).

This facility is interactive so other pieces can be added by e-mailing editor@antiquity.ac.uk

The World Archaeological Congress is committed to making attendance at its meetings as representative of the world's populations as possible. It particularly encourages archaeologists from economically disadvantaged countries and interested members of Indigenous populations to attend its congresses. Toward that end, the President and Executive of WAC have appointed a Travel Support Committee and have allocated limited funds to help underwrite travel by people in the two targeted categories to the Sixth World Archaeological Congress in Dublin, Ireland. Support is available to help with registration, accommodation and partial transportation costs to and from the meetings.

For those who are seeking WAC assistance with the participation of people from economically disadvantaged countries, or Indigenous groups, the info is on the WAC web site, under news, in the side-bar.

2. WAC News

2 (a)

2 (b) WAC-6 News

2 (c) WAC-5 volumes published by Left Coast Press

Members are reminded that the published volumes from WAC-5 are available.  The One World Archaeology Series is published by Left Coast Press.
           
The details are on the Left Coast Press web site,
http://www.lcoastpress.com/books_series.php?id=13

3. News from WAC Members

from Dan Hicks

On 1 August, Dan tookup a Lectureship-Curatorship in Archaeology of the Modern Period, based at the School of Archaeology and Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford, and will also be a Fellow of St Cross College.

New email address: dan.hicks@arch.ox.ac.uk 

4. New publications by WAC members

The Nation and its Ruins: Antiquity, Archaeology, and National
 Imagination in Greece

Yannis Hamilakis
 ISBN-13: 978-0-19-923038-9
 Publication date: July 2007
 376 pages, 51 in-text illustrations, 216x138 mm
 Series: Classical Presences

 This innovative, extensively illustrated study examines how classical
 antiquities and archaeology contributed significantly to the production
 of the modern Greek nation and its national imagination. It also shows
 how, in return, national imagination has created and shaped classical
 antiquities and archaeological practice from the nineteenth century to
 the present. Yannis Hamilakis covers a diverse range of topics,
 including the role of antiquities in the foundation of the Greek state
 in the nineteenth century, the Elgin marbles controversy, the role of
 archaeology under dictatorial regimes, the use of antiquities in the
 detention camps of the Greek civil war, and the discovery of the
 so-called tomb of Philip of Macedonia.

Contents
 1. Memories cast in marble: introduction
 2. The `soldiers' the `priests'. and the `hospitals for contagious
 diseases': the producers of archaeological matter-realities
 3. From the Western to indigenous Hellenism: archaeology, antiquity, and
 the invention of modern Greece
 4. The archaeologist as shaman the sensory national archaeology of
 Manolis Andronikos
 5. Spartan visions: antiquity and the Metaxas dictatorship
 6. The other Parthenon: antiquity and national memory at the
 concentration camp
 7. Nostalgia for the whole: the Parthenon (or `Elgin') marbles
 8. The nation in ruins? Conclusions

Dan Hicks’ new book "The Garden of the World": An Historical Archaeology of Eastern Caribbean Sugar Landscapes (2007. Oxford: Archaeopress, British Archaeological Reports International Series 1632, Studies in Contemporary and Historical Archaeology 3).

Dan Hicks’One World Archaeology book will be published in the autumn (edited with Laura McAtackney and Graham Fairclough).

5. News Items

CHAT 2007 - the 5th annual meeting of the group, which takes place in Sheffield in November (convened by James Symonds). See http://www.shef.ac.uk/archaeology/conferences/chat-2007/index.htm)

Conservators Without Borders Launches their 2007 Programme in Greece
Christie Pohl, Melina Smirniou and Dominica D'Arcangelo are founding members of Conservators without Borders – an aspiring international program that provides field conservation support to archaeological sites where insufficient funding inhibits on-site conservation activity.  Conservators Without Borders launched this summer with a successful project in Kythera, Greece.  A second project is scheduled for October 2007 in Jarash, Jordan.
Conservators Without Borders was conceived while the three founding members were enrolled in the MSc Conservation for Archaeology and Museums at University College London (UCL).  UCL Futures awarded the team a grant which has allowed them to pilot their programme in 2007 and 2008.  Conservators Without Bordersgives priority to sites in countries where finds are in need of special or urgent conservation attention (either during or post-excavation).  Other primary objectives of the initiative include outreach to local communities, the determination of sustainable methods of on-going conservation, collaboration with archaeologists and specialists on-site and training conservation students, volunteers and interested members of the local communities.

The first 2007 project took place on the island of Kythera, Greece. The archaeological material in need was excavated in the 1960's by the British School at Athens and includes Minoan, Classical and Roman artifacts from the coastal site of Kastri.  Objects have been subjected to fluctuating environmental conditions since excavations in the 1960’s.  This has resulted in dramatic deterioration.  A severe earthquake in 2006 made the situation more urgent.  The team treated objects from this collection that were actively deteriorating and re-housed them in more suitable storage conditions to prevent further damage. Working with archaeologists and specialists from the British School at Athens advice was provided on conservation methods and best practices.  UCL MSc student, Sarahi Naidorf joined the team in Kythera and contributed greatly to the project. 

Founding member, Melina Smirniou says of the first project, ‘Our first project in Kythera went really well. The experience was wonderful mainly due to the warm welcoming of our hosts. We managed to repack and stabilise a large amount of small finds, and we'll definitely be back next year to continue.’

For more information, contact:
Dominica@conservatorswithoutborders.org

Publications

New from Left Coast Press, Inc. WAC members receive a 20% discount on hardcovers and a 30% discount on paperbacks (insert discount code L187 at checkout)

From the One Word Archaeology Series sponsored by the World Archaeological Congress

Rethinking Agriculture: Archaeological and Ethnoarchaeological Perspectives
Timothy P. Denham, Jose Iriarte, Luc Vrydaghs, eds
Coming Soon! Expected publication June 2007, 600 pages, $99.00 Hardcover
ISBN: 978-1-59874-260-2

Although the need to study agriculture in different parts of the world on its ‘own terms’ has long-been recognized and re-affirmed, a tendency persists to evaluate agriculture across the globe using concepts, lines of evidence and methods derived from Eurasian research. This volume highlights new archaeological and ethnoarchaeological research on early agriculture in understudied non-Eurasian regions, including Island Southeast Asia and the Pacific, the Americas and Africa, to present a more balanced view of the origins and development of agricultural practices around the globe.

Envisioning Landscape: Perspectives and Politics in Archaeology and Heritage
Dan Hicks, Laura McAtackney, and Graham Fairclough, eds.
Coming Soon! Expected publication August 2007, 400 pages, $79.00 Hardcover
ISBN 978-1-59874-281-7

The common feature of landscape archaeology is its diversity – of method, field location, disciplinary influences and contemporary voices. The contributors to this volume take advantage of these many strands to investigate landscape archaeology in its multiple forms, focusing primarily on the link to heritage, the impact on our understanding of temporality, and the situated theory that arises out of landscape studies. Using examples from New York to Northern Ireland, Africa to the Argolid, these pieces capture the human significance of material objects in support of a more comprehensive, nuanced archaeology.

Archaeology and Capitalism: From Ethics to Politics
Yannis Hamilakis and Philip Duke, eds.
Coming Soon! Expected publication August 2007, 352 pages, $79.00 Hardcover
ISBN 978-1-59874-270-1

The editors and contributors to this volume focus on the inherent political nature of archaeology and its impact on the practice of the discipline. The discipline is not about an abstract “archaeological record” but about living individuals and communities, whose lives and heritage suffer from the abuse of power relationships with states and their agents. Only by recognizing this power disparity, and adopting a political ethic for the discipline, can archaeology justify its activities. A direct challenge to the discipline, this volume will provoke discussion, disagreement, and inspiration for many in the field.

Also available in the One Word Archaeology Series
African Re-Genesis: Confronting Social Issues in the Diaspora
Jay B. Haviser and Kevin C. MacDonald
Published May 2006, 294 pages, $34.95 (paperback)
ISBN: 978-1-59874-283-1

Archaeology to Delight and Instruct: Active Learning in the University Classroom
Heather Burke and Claire Smith
Published January 2007, 288 pages, $29.95 (paperback)
ISBN: 978-1-59874-257-2

A Fearsome Heritage: Diverse Legacies of the Cold War 
John Schofield and Wayne Cocroft, eds
Published March 2007, 336 pages, $79.00 Hardcover
ISBN: 978-1-59874-258-9

Living under the Shadow: Cultural Impacts of Volcanic Eruptions
John Grattan and Robin Torrence, eds.
Coming Soon! Expected publication August 2007, 416 pages, $79.00 Hardcover
ISBN 978-1-59874-268-9

To order, visit our website at:
http://www.lcoastpress.com
For more information, contact Caryn Berg at archaeology@LCoastPress.com

**Other news items

6. Excerpts from other archaeological associations’ newsletters (used with permission)

6 (b) SALON - the Society of Antiquaries of London Online Newsletter

from Salon
SALON Editor: Christopher Catling

         
SALON - the Society of Antiquaries of London Online Newsletter
Salon 170: 6 August 2007
SALON Editor: Christopher Catling

Contents

  • New on the website: the archive is back
  • ERIH journal rankings: David Breeze responds

New on the website: the archive is back

In response to popular demand, the archive section of the Society’s website has been put back on line – yes, it was a surprise when Fellows asked for this, but apparently the archive section, with its obituaries and accounts of past meetings, is valued as a research and reference tool – so it can now be accessed once again in the Fellows’ area.

Also in the password-protected Fellows area are the minutes of the March Council meeting, which was the last meeting to be held prior to the recent Council and Presidential elections, while the latest version of the Society’s business plan, which was approved by Council at its July meeting, is available on the public side.

The online shop has been launched, so buying one of the Society’s silk ties or a limited edition Tercentenary medal is as easy as quoting your credit card number and waiting for the post to arrive. Stationery and greetings cards will soon be added to the product range.

ERIH journal rankings: David Breeze responds

Our Fellow David Breeze read Salon’s recent report on the European Reference Index for the Humanities (ERIH) – a ranking of archaeology and history journals drawn up by the European Science Foundation – with growing puzzlement. Rather than ignore the index and hope that it will go away, David believes that Fellows should use the online feedback procedure to respond with their views. David has conducted his own ‘peer review’ of the journal rankings by canvassing colleagues for their reactions; here are his preliminary conclusions.

‘The production by the European Science Foundation of a ranked list of journals will no doubt raise many hackles. However, there is a facility for feedback and I would encourage Fellows to use it. Here are my first thoughts on apparent inconsistencies.

‘Some journals of foreign schools are in category A (Annual of the British School in Athens; Levant; the seven Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Institutes) while Papers of the British School at Rome is in B and Pharos, Nederlands Instituut Athene is in C. There is no Dutch-language journal listed and only two Russian journals.

‘Some journals which cover a single country are in C (the Journal of Irish Archaeology, the Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland); others in B (Archaeologia Bulgarica, Archéologie Suisse, Acta Archaelogica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae). How are countries defined? Archaeologia Cambrensis and Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland are in C.

‘Why are Medieval Archaeology and Post-Medieval Archaeology in A, but Britannia in B? Why is the Archaeological Journal not included at all?

‘What’s in a title? It is interesting to see the Flanders Archaeological Bulletin in the list. Or a place: the Cambridge Archaeological Journal and the Oxford Journal of Archaeology are in A, the Bonner Jahrbücher in B, though the Carnuntum Jahrbuch, which also contains “international” material, is C.

‘Is it being too cynical to ask if Public Archaeology had entitled itself The International Journal of Public Archaeology it would have been raised from a B to an A?

‘I note that Archaeologia Aeliana, founded in 1822, is included (though only as a C), but not its fellow journal on the west side of the country, Transactions of the Cumberland and Westmoreland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society (first published in 1874 and also a refereed journal), though the Derbyshire Archaeological Journal and some other county journals are. Needless to say, coverage of British county journals is patchy. AA and TCWAAS, incidentally, are the two primary journals for the publication of material on Hadrian’s Wall, a World Heritage Site: should that count in their favour?

‘No one can doubt the magnitude of the task, nor can we all put on one side our prejudices (I acknowledge choosing some journals for specific mention above because I have published in them). But it would be helpful to have more information on the process and assurance that the views of those outside the process will be taken into account.’

SALON - the Society of Antiquaries of London Online Newsletter
Salon 169: 23 July 2007

SALON Editor: Christopher Catling

Contents

  • European Science Foundation’s index of archaeology and history journals
  • Irish minister to review heritage protection
  • Reconciling physical anthropology and DNA studies
  • Tests on 'Ice Maiden' reveal Pacific links

European Science Foundation’s index of archaeology and history journals

The European Science Foundation has published its ‘initial’ European Reference Index for the Humanities (ERIH), consisting of fifteen list of journals in various disciplines, including archaeology and history, ranking them as A (high-ranking international publications with a very strong reputation among researchers of the field in different countries, regularly cited all over the world), B (standard international publications with a good reputation among researchers of the field in different countries) or C (research journals with an important local / regional significance in Europe, occasionally cited outside the publishing country though their main target group is the domestic academic community).

The Antiquaries Journal has been ranked ‘C’ in the archaeology and history lists, and some highly regarded and long-established archaeological journals have not been graded at all, including the Royal Archaeological Institute’s Archaeological Journal and the Journal of the British Archaeological Association.

The ESF has 75 member organisations made up of research councils, academies and funding agencies from the science and humanities research communities in thirty European countries. Its remit is to fund pan-European scientific research initiatives that cross traditional disciplinary boundaries.

The ESF’s determination to create a hierarchy of journalistic ‘excellence’ has been controversial from the start, with academics questioning whether the ESF has a remit to undertake such work, and arguing that such exercises are misleading, wrong-headed and impracticable. Previous issues of Salon have reported on deep misgivings amongst academic archaeologists in the UK about the ranking criteria, and about whether the same criteria are being applied consistently by national panels of adjudicators across all parts of Europe. In the UK, for example, the archaeological rankings show a clear bias towards science- and theory-based publications at the expense of those whose papers are based in more traditional archaeological or historical methodologies.

Our Fellow Mark Horton, of Bristol University, said that there are many risks inherent in such rankings: ‘It is crucial for the Research Assessment Exercise, as effectively only articles in 'A' journals will be submitted, it is crucial for the Society’s reputation in Europe as a serious academic institution and it could affect library purchasing decisions’, he said. The ESF’s own website clearly recognises that universities might also use the journal rankings as a guide to appointing or promoting staff or allocating research funding, and warns against this, saying that ‘the lists are not a bibliometric tool’.

There is an online feedback procedure for Individuals and organisations who wish to make representations to the ESF prior to the next revision of the listings in 2008. Full details are on the ESF website.

Irish minister to review heritage protection
Irish Minister for the Environment John Gormley says he is to review how the State protects its national heritage following the controversy over the planned construction of the M3 motorway over historic landscapes near the Hill of Tara. Mr Gormley said that Tara and ‘similar controversies’ of recent years raised the ‘valid question’ as to whether the current measures to protect archaeological and natural landscape in Ireland are adequate. ‘I agree with bodies such as the Heritage Council who have said that we do need enhanced measures. Therefore in the coming weeks I will begin a consultative process in order to bring forward a new National Landscape Strategy.’ However, he insisted he had no legal power to review the decision of his predecessor Dick Roche on the route of the motorway, and said that he had received ‘unequivocal’ advice from the Attorney General that it ‘is not open to him to review, or amend, the directions given by his predecessor in this case’.

The announcement from Mr Gormley comes after an undesignated ‘multi-period archaeological complex’ dating from the Bronze Age was destroyed by bulldozers during the night of 4 July 2007 to prevent road construction being held up. The Campaign to Save Tara group said the site had been recommended for designation by archaeologists working on the M3 project but former environment minister Dick Roche had rejected the application.

Reconciling physical anthropology and DNA studies

Andrea Manica and Bill Amos of Cambridge University have used a combination of genetic analysis and skull measurement in an attempt to show that these two different approaches to understanding human evolution tell the same story – which is that modern humans are all descendants of one group who colonised the globe from southern central Africa.
Some physical anthropologists have argued that separate populations of Homo sapiens arose independently in different regions and that interbreeding between these separate groups produced today’s human populations.

The Cambridge study, published in Nature, was based on an examination of genetic diversity in fifty-three human populations across the world and variations in the size and shape of 6,000 skulls from around the world. Both told the same story of variability in physical appearance and genetic make-up diminishing the further those populations were from Africa.
‘The origin of anatomically modern humans has been the focus of much heated debate’, Dr Manica said. ‘Our research shows the further modern humans have migrated from Africa, the more genetic diversity has been lost within a population. Some have used skull data to argue that modern humans originated in multiple spots around the world. We have combined our genetic data with new measurements of a large sample of skulls to show definitively that modern humans originated from a single area in sub-Saharan Africa. Indigenous people living in Australia and South America show the lowest amount of genetic variation as well as differences between the shapes and sizes of their skulls. Meanwhile, the genetic and physical variation between people living in Africa is the greatest anywhere in the world.’

Tests on 'Ice Maiden' reveal Pacific links
               
The results have been announced of DNA tests on the so-called ‘Ice Maiden’, a twelve- to fourteen-year–old girl who was apparently sacrificed by Inca priests on top of Mount Ambato near Arequipa in the Peruvian Andes in about 1480. Her frozen and well-preserved body was discovered in September 1995 by anthropologists Johan Reinhard and Miguel Zarate. Her DNA was now been analysed at the Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) in Rockville, Maryland, which reports: ‘We conclude from our analysis that the Ice Maiden’s mitochondrial DNA HV1 sequence places her precisely in the native American Indian Haplogroup A. Her HV2 DNA sequence represents a new HV2 variant not found in the current mitochondrial DNA sequence databases and is most closely related to the Ngobe people of Panama and to Taiwanese and Korean races.’

Obituaries on the Antiquity website

The question of balance in obituaries, which was raised in last week’s Salon, prompted a response from our Fellow Martin Carver who pointed out that Antiquity’s ‘In Memoriam’ section publishes tributes and comments on a wide variety of archaeologists.
Martin writes: ‘The advantages of our new service are: first, that anybody from any country may be remembered, not only those famous enough at the time of their death to be noticed by the Guardian or Times; and second, that once a preliminary tribute is mounted anybody may add their comments. The editor does reserve the right to moderate the intemperate (no unseemly dancing on graves is permitted). Please send your tribute or comment to .’ Martin adds: ‘My hope is that, in the long term, we shall be creating a veritable prosopography of those who gave their professional lives to find out about the past of this planet.’

As well as a number of tributes to the late Peter Ucko, the Antiquity site also has an appreciation by our Fellow Richard Hodges of the life of Professor Riccardo Francovich, who died on 30 March 2007 after a fall at Fiesole. Richard writes that Riccardo was ‘an immense figure whose passion, generosity and humour touched everyone who knew him … Riccardo was the force behind medieval archaeology in Italy as well as the great proponent of archaeological parks. Being a brilliantly creative academic and an exceptional manager with a richly charismatic ability to deal with people, he was able to pursue his projects on a great scale. By the time of his death he had more than a hundred young archaeologists either working on doctorates or on contracts in the University of Siena.’

6 (b)  ICOMOS (Australia) (editions from August and July 2007) 

Australia ICOMOS E-Mail News No. 294
Friday 10 August 2007

Contents

  • World Heritage Studies  Master of Arts Programme
  • Opportunity for Leverhulme PD Fellowship in Uni. of Leicester, Dept. of Museum Studies

Opportunity for Leverhulme Post-doctoral Fellowship in University of Leicester, Dept. of Museum Studies

To Museum and Heritage Researchers

The Department of Museum Studies at the University of Leicester is seeking expressions of interest from post-doctoral researchers with an exciting museum and/ or heritage related research project which would benefit from a 9-10 month fellowship in the Department. Fellows are encouraged not only to conduct research but also to give lectures and seminars and to participate in the intellectual life of the institution.

This Leverhulme Visiting Fellowship:

  • Is for 9-10 months and must begin no later than February 2009
  • has a living allowance of up to 1,750 per month
  • pays for a return airfare between country of residence and the UK
  • provides up to ?700 towards travel and subsistence for conference attendance, research trips etc.

Eligibility:

  • candidates with less than 8 years post-doctoral research
  • candidates must be citizens of, and resident in, a country other than the UK, and should intend to return to that country at the end of the Fellowship.
  • Applications should consist of the following:
  • Brief CV of candidate;
  • Summary of proposed research and other activities (around 100 wds);
  • Indication of duration;
  • Breakdown of costs and any internal or other external support provided.

Please email your application to Dr Lisanne Gibson (lg80@le.ac.uk) by 5pm (GMT) 21st September 2007. We will consider applications for submission of the best application to the University for consideration by the University's 8th October 2007 deadline. Late applications will not be accepted.

Please direct all enquiries to Dr Lisanne Gibson at the contact details listed below.

Lisanne Gibson BA, PhD (Griffith)
Department of Museum Studies
University of Leicester
105 Princess Road East
Leicester, LE17LG, UK
Ph: +44 (0) 116 252 5719
Email: lg80@le.ac.uk

Australia ICOMOS E-Mail News No. 293
Friday 3 August 2007

Contents

  • World Heritage Seminar and AGM at the Sydney Opera House
  • 6th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities
  • News from ICCROM

World Heritage Seminar and AGM at the Sydney Opera House
Australia ICOMOS usually holds its AGM in conjunction with the Annual Conference to make it easier for members from other States and Territories to attend. This year, because our Cairns conference was in July, the AGM will be a separate event in Sydney on Friday 23 November. To encourage you to come, we are planning to hold a half-day seminar beforehand on World Heritage, at Australia's latest World Heritage site. Put the date in your diary now - more details to come! The following is an extract from the Statement of Outstanding Universal Value adopted by the World Heritage Committee when it inscribed the Opera House on the World Heritage List:

The Sydney Opera House constitutes a masterpiece of 20th century architecture. Its significance is based on its unparalleled design and construction; its exceptional engineering achievements and technological innovation and its position as a world-famous icon of architecture. It is a daring and visionary experiment that has had an enduring influence on the emergent architecture of the late 20th century. Utzon’s original design concept and his unique approach to building gave impetus to a collective creativity including architects, engineers and builders. Ove Arup’s engineering achievements helped make Utzon’s vision a reality. The design represents an extraordinary interpretation and response to the setting in Sydney Harbour. The Sydney Opera House is also of outstanding universal value for its achievements in structural engineering and building technology. The building is a great artistic monument and an icon, accessible to society at large.

Criterion i: The Sydney Opera House is a great architectural work of the 20th century. It represents multiple strands of creativity, both in architectural form and structural design, a great urban sculpture carefully set in a remarkable waterscape and a world famous iconic building.

6th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities

Annual Hawaii International Conference on Arts & Humanities
January 11 - 14, 2008
Waikiki Beach Marriott Resort & Spa, Hilton Waikiki Prince Kuhio
Honolulu Hawaii, USA

Sponsored by:
University of Louisville - Center for Sustainable Urban Neighborhoods
The Baylor Journal of Theatre and Performance

Hawaii International Conference on Arts & Humanities
P.O. Box 75036
Honolulu, HI 96836 USA
Telephone: (808) 542-4385
Fax: (808) 947-2420
E-mail: humanities@hichumanities.org
Website: http://www.hichumanities.org

News from ICCROM

COURSE ANNOUNCEMENTS
CollAsia 2010 - Traditional Knowledge and Scientific Principles of Conservation
2 August. Applications are now open for the CollAsia 2010 course on Traditional Knowledge and Scientific Principles of Conservation to be held in Laos from 19 November - 14 December 2007.
Application deadline: 15 September
http://www.iccrom.org/eng/01train_en/announce_en/2007_11CollAsia_en.shtml

AFRICA 2009 - Thematic seminar: Communication as a means to conserve and manage immovable heritage
24 May.  Applications are now open for the Thematic Seminar: Communication as a means to conserve and manage immovable heritage to be held in Mauritania from 22 - 23 October.2007.
Application deadline: 31 August 2007
http://www.iccrom.org/eng/01train_en/announce_en/2007_10Africa2009Mauritania_en.shtml

ICCROM LIBRARY
Reopening: following the summer book cleaning project, the ICCROM Library will reopen to the public on Monday 6 August.

NEWS
Heritage news in the media worldwide
A new feature on the web site: a monthly compilation of media articles on heritage topics. Obviously, these all reflect the viewpoints of the authors.
July: http://www.iccrom.org/eng/news_en/2007_en/field_en/07press_en.shtml

Forum 2007: Privatisation and Cultural Heritage
2 August. Since the announcement of the Forum, ICCROM has received many enquiries about participating in the event. As well as the scientific papers, there will also be opportunities to send in comments on your experiences, insights, and reflections on 'Privatisation and Cultural Heritage' and to present posters.
http://www.iccrom.org/eng/news_en/2007_en/events_en/08_02meetingForum2007_en.shtml

ICCROM
iccrom@iccrom.org
http://www.iccrom.org

Australia ICOMOS E-Mail News No. 292
Friday 27th July 2007

Contents

  • World Heritage Seminar and AGM at the Sydney Opera House
  • 2007 International Tourism, Culture and Education Forum
  • World Heritage Studies - Master of Arts Programme

World Heritage Seminar and AGM at the Sydney Opera House

Australia ICOMOS usually holds its AGM in conjunction with the Annual Conference to make it easier for members from other States and Territories to attend. This year, because our Cairns conference was in July, the AGM will be a separate event in Sydney on Friday 23 November. To encourage you to come, we are planning to hold a half-day seminar beforehand on World Heritage, at Australia's latest World Heritage site. Put the date in your diary now - more details to come! The following is an extract from the Statement of Outstanding Universal Value adopted by the World Heritage Committee when it inscribed the Opera House on the World Heritage List:

The Sydney Opera House constitutes a masterpiece of 20th century architecture. Its significance is based on its unparalleled design and construction; its exceptional engineering achievements and technological innovation and its position as a world-famous icon of architecture. It is a daring and visionary experiment that has had an enduring influence on the emergent architecture of the late 20th century. Utzon’s original design concept and his unique approach to building gave impetus to a collective creativity including architects, engineers and builders. Ove Arup’s engineering achievements helped make Utzon’s vision a reality. The design represents an extraordinary interpretation and response to the setting in Sydney Harbour. The Sydney Opera House is also of outstanding universal value for its achievements in structural engineering and building technology. The building is a great artistic monument and an icon, accessible to society at large.

Criterion i: The Sydney Opera House is a great architectural work of the 20th century. It represents multiple strands of creativity, both in architectural form and structural design, a great urban sculpture carefully set in a remarkable waterscape and a world famous iconic building.

2007 International Tourism, Culture and Education Forum
New Approaches to Sustainable Tourism and Human Resource Development
Yanji, China, 13-15 July 2007

The South Australian ICOMOS Representative, Elizabeth Vines, attended this forum, travelling to Yanji which is in the north east area of China, neighbouring North Korea.  The Education Forum for Asia has previously held three Annual Conferences - 2004, 2005 and 2006 - and the forum aims to be a platform for the enquiry into all the problems in the development of Asian education, high level exchange, enquiry and cooperation in the Asia Pacific Region.  Yanji is located in the Yanjian Korean autonomous prefecture which is the largest region where ethnic Koreans live in compact communities - it has a common border with Russia and North Korea, and Yanji City is the capital of the prefecture.  The forum was for one day and focussed heavily on the development of tourism in this somewhat remote region of China. 

A variety of papers were presented, including one on Las Vegas, offering this as a potential model for tourism activity and development in this region of China.  Issues of sustainability and the impact of climate change requiring a shift to responsible tourism were not discussed - these issues now being focussed upon in other tourism conferences.  A site visit followed to the Changbai Mountain, the highest crater lake in the world, and delegates were fortunate to see this site free of cloud cover, with this being achieved usually in only 30% of visits.  The usual hospitality of the Chinese was very generous, and the conference provided stimulating discussions and interesting perspective on the issues of cultural tourism in areas of China away from major cities. 

ELIZABETH VINES
ICOMOS SA Representative

World Heritage Studies  Master of Arts Programme
At Brandenburg University of Technology (BTU), Cottbus, Germany

World Heritage Studies is a unique and innovative programme that takes up the technical, socio-economic, cultural, ecological and political challenges related to the protection of World Heritage by the means of an interdisciplinary curriculum.  It cuts across all faculties of BTU. 

The program is taught in English.
For details including application deadlines please consult the website   www.tu-cottbus.de/whs

Programme Director: Prof Dr. Marie-Theres Albert

Programme Coordinator whs.coordinator@tu-cottbus.de

Australia ICOMOS E-Mail News No. 291
Friday 20th July 2007

Contents

  • CIAV: Annual Conference - Preserving Traditional Landscapes

ICOMOS International Scientific Committee on Vernacular Architecture  CIAV
Annual Conference - Preserving Traditional Landscapes

8 December 2007,
Banaue, Ifugao Province
Philippines

The main theme of the conference is "The Preservation of Traditional Landscapes"

Sub theme A: Traditional landscapes and vernacular architecture: resource for cultural tourism
Sub theme B: Benefits from preservation of cultural landscapes and vernacular architecture

The location for the CIAV 2007 Annual Conference, in Banaue, Ifugao Province in the Philippines is appropriate since the site is one of the few places in the world where a continuing traditional landscape is preserved within the context of both the natural and cultural environment.

Three sites chosen for the conference case study are the World Heritage terrace clusters of Bangaan, Batad, and Mayoyao. In these sites are seen the cultural manifestations of traditional landscapes in the ceremonies and rituals, in the traditional architecture, engineering, environmental practices, and in the agriculture practiced by the people, a true nature-culture continuum.

These sites, inscribed in the World Heritage List as the Rice Terraces of the Philippine Cordilleras, have been listed in the World Heritage In Danger List. In the most recent WH mission conducted on the property, actions and benchmarks have been set to remove it from the WH List in Danger, one of the more relevant actions being the "Immediate implementation of the Conservation and Management Plan, with focus on community based activities such as zoning and land use plans responding to traditional value systems and providing regulations over tourism and infrastructure development."

It is hoped that this meeting will generate information useful to the Philippine government in addressing issues related to the site. The outcome of the discussions on the topic of traditional landscapes and their sustainable use as a resource for cultural tourism could help identify key issues and recommend solutions that lead to the realization of action plans resulting in achieving benchmarks set by UNESCO to remove the site from the World Heritage List in Danger.

ICOMOS Philippines invites CIAV members to participate in this event.
Following the Eger-Xian Principles and the spirit of encouraging cross-fertilization between ICOMOS Scientific Committees, ICTC members are invited to participate as observers and to contribute their expertise to the issues on hand. Other ICOMOS members and specialists concerned with this issue are also cordially invited to attend.

For more information, please contact the
ICOMOS PHILIPPINE COMMITTEE

icomos.ph@gmail.com

Australia ICOMOS E-Mail News No. 289
An information service provided by the Australia ICOMOS Secretariat
Friday 6 July 2007

Contents

  • ICOMOS International Training Committee
  • News from ICCROM

ICOMOS International Training Committee

INTERNATIONAL WORKING CONFERENCE
 “Training and Education in Crafts for Conservation”
18-21 October 2007
Pisa
Italy

The Training Committee of ICOMOS in collaboration with the City of Pisa will be holding a conference from the 18th till the 21st of October.

The focal point of the conference will be the consideration that craft and craftsmanship are central in our efforts to preserve our heritage. All our knowledge and research will at some point have to find its way into crafts and craftsmanship.

The outcome of the conference will be presented at the General Assembly in Quebec  2008.
For more information:
CIF: CASPAR M LAFFRÉE
c.o. Instituut Collectie Nederland or  Fax to: +31 (0)20 305 4700
P.O. Box 76709           
NL-1070 KA Amsterdam
The Netherlands
E-mail: caspar.laffree@icn.nl

News from ICCROM
http://www.iccrom.org/index.shtml

NEW MEMBER STATE
2July. ICCROM is pleased to announce the adhesion of Lesotho as a new Member State as of 1 July 2007. The adhesion of Lesotho brings the number of Member States of ICCROM to 120.

COURSE ANNOUNCEMENTS
Regional course on preservation and restoration of wooden structures, Japan, 2007
1June. Applications are now open for the regional course on preservation and restoration of wooden structures in the Asia Pacific Region to be held in Japan from 18 September  19 October 2007.
Application deadline: 6 July 2007
http://www.iccrom.org/eng/01train_en/announce_en/2007_09woodNara_en.shtml

AFRICA 2009 - Special Thematic Seminar: Cultural Heritage Management and the Challenges of HIV/AIDS
24 May.  Applications are now open for the Special Thematic Seminar: Cultural Heritage Management and the Challenges of HIV/AIDS to be held in Zambia from 19  23 November 2007.
Application deadline: 17 July 2007
http://www.iccrom.org/eng/01train_en/announce_en/2007_11Africa2009Zambia_en.shtml

ICCROM LIBRARY
Closure
2 July. From 2 July - 3 August, the ICCROM Library will be closed to the public during summer 2007 for book cleaning.

NEWS
ATHÂR course begins
14 June. Under the Patronage the Minister of Tourism and Antiquities of Jordan, and the auspices of ATHÂR Programme, the Second Core Regional Course on Conservation of Heritage Sites in the Arab Region began.
http://www.iccrom.org/eng/news_en/2007_en/events_en/06_06courseATHAR_en.shtml

ICCROM
iccrom@iccrom.org
http://www.iccrom.org

Australia ICOMOS E-Mail News No. 287

Friday 29th   June 2007

Contents

  • 2008 Getty Research Grants
  • PIMA Annual Report now available

2008 Getty Research Grants

Deadline for all Getty Research grants:  1 November, 2007

Details now available for Residential Research Grants &Non Residential Research grants

Residential Research Grants
A variety of grants to pursue research at the Getty Centre and the Getty Villa
- Theme Year Scholars at the Getty Research Institute
- Theme Year Scholars at the Getty Villa
- Library Research Grants
- Conservation Guest Schollars
- Additional short residencies to invited guest scholars

Non-residential research grants
A variety of opportunities to pursue research wherever scholars choose
- Collaborative Research Grants
- Postdoctoral Fellowships
- Curatorial Research fellowships

How to apply:
Detailed instructions, application forms and additional information available online at www.getty.edu  click on Foundation

Address inquiries to:

Attn: (Type of Grant)
The Getty Foundation
1200 Getty Center Drive,
Suite 800
Los Angeles CA 90049-1685 USA

Phone 310 440 7374
Fax 310 440 7703
Email researchgrants@getty.edu

PIMA Annual Report now available

The Annual & Financial Reports for the Pacific Islands Museums Association for 2006 is now available.
For more information contact:

Meredith Blake
Volunteer for International Development from Australia (VIDA)
Secretary General to the Boards of the Pacific Islands Museums Association (PIMA) and ICOMOS Pasifika
C/- Vanuatu Cultural Centre
PO Box 184 Port Vila, Vanuatu
Ph: (678) 28063 or (678) 28064 or (678) 22129
Mobile: (678) 56137
Fax: (678) 26590

Disclaimer: Opinions expressed in the Australia ICOMOS Email News are not necessarily those of Australia ICOMOS Inc. or its Executive Committee. The text of Australia ICOMOS Email news is drawn from various sources including organizations other than Australia ICOMOS Inc. The Australia ICOMOS Email news serves solely as an information source and aims to present a wide range of opinions which may be of interest to readers. Articles submitted for inclusion may be edited.

Australia ICOMOS Secretariat
Nola Miles
Secretariat Officer
Cultural Heritage Centre for the Asia and the Pacific
Faculty of Arts
Deakin University
221 Burwood Highway
Burwood, Victoria 3125
Ph: 61 3 9251 7131
Fax: 61 3 9251 7158
Email: austicomos@deakin.edu.au
www.icomos.org/australia

7 Looking for experts

Past Preservers is looking for experts
Heritage Consultants, Past Preservers was founded by archaeologists Nigel J. Hetherington and Kelly L. Krause in 2006 to provide historical and archaeological consultancy and professional support to the media industry and the archaeological community.
We are currently looking for experts in all fields who would like to join our database for involvement both on and off camera in future documentaries.
We would also to hear from archaeologists seeking media representation.
If you are interested please forward us a CV, a photo and a pen portrait (you in 100 words or less).

For further information about us and our services please see our website www.pastpreservers.com

We look forward to hearing from you.
Nigel Hetherington and Kelly Krause        
nigel@pastpreservers.com
Kelly@paspreservers.com